Maria Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos-Recto (born Maria Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos November 3, 1953 in Bamban, Tarlac), commonly known as Vilma Santos-Recto or Ate Vi is a Filipino actress and box office queen for almost four decades. One of the original Philippine movie queens, she rose up to become the versatile actress that has been given the fitting title of “Star for All Seasons” because of her capacity to adapt to the changing mores and values of the Filipino woman, giving a face to their plight and struggles, albeit in success both critically and box-office wise in some of Philippine cinema’s classics such as Trudis Liit (1963), Lipad, Darna, Lipad (1973), Burlesk Queen (1977), Relasyon (1982), Sister Stella L. (1984), Alyas Baby Tsina (1984), Pahiram ng Isang Umaga (1989), Dahil Mahal Kita: The Dolzura Cortez Story (1993), Anak (2000) and Dekada ’70 (2002). She is currently the governor of Batangas, Philippines (2012)(Wikipedia).

For More Informations, Visit: Vilma Santos-Recto's Official Web-site

Sunday, June 30, 2013

Relasyon (Videos)

Basic Information: Directed: Ishmael Bernal; Story: Ricardo Lee; Screenplay: Ricardo Lee, Raquel Villavicencion, Ishmael Bernal; Cast: Vilma Santos, Christopher De Leon, Jimi Melendez, Ernie Zarate, Lucy Quinto, Manny Castañeda, Beth Mondragon, Bing Fabregas, Olive Madridejos, Augusto Victa, Dante Castro, Tony Angeles, Thaemar Achacoso; Executive producer: Lily Monteverde; Original Music: Winston Raval; Cinematography: Sergio Lobo; Film Editing: Augusto Salvador; Production Design: Benjie De Guzman; Art Direction: Dennis Cid; Sound: Vic Macamay; Theme Songs: "Relasyon" performed by Eva Eugenio

Plot Description: He sees nothing wrong in having a wife and a mistress. She would do anything to make him happy, including putting up with his idiosyncrasies, babysitting his child, and finding loopholes in the law so she could be with him. The characters are so familiar and so realistic that you might see yourself. Vilma Santos and Christopher de Leon star in this very touching story about two people who truly love each other but are trapped by the circumstances. Relasyon is another fine motion picture from director Ishmael Bernal. - Regal Films

"...The story of an adulterous affair, and its implications for the families involved..." - British Film Institute (READ MORE)







Friday, June 28, 2013

Gina Alajar and Vilma Santos


The Truth - "...When you are young, malakas ang loob mong maghiwalay because it marks new beginning in your life. There are options to take and it was easy to let go. I tried to save my marriage and worked hard for it, and every time we're back into each other arms, I felt God heard my prayers," she reveals...Gina hopes to regain her self-esteem and self-respect with the decision she made. "I finally accepted the truth that the situation is real. I used to entertain false hopes. Not anymore, I feel totally free..." - Remy M. Umerez, Philippine Daily Inquirer, Jan 1, 2002 (READ MORE)

The Roles - "...Yes, I am aware that theater-owners have a say on the kind of movies they would exhibit in their theaters and they usually have suggestions on the stars producers should hire to recoup their investments,” she had said. . “But you can’t argue against formula movies. They make money for the producers and they are good business for theater exhibitors. However, I need not figure in those formula movies although I find myself in some of those predictable projects. But making movies is also about good craftsmanship, it is also about the fine art of acting and not always primarily about making oodles of money. In most of my movies, I sometimes sacrifice the fees I deserve to be identified with film projects you believe in.”...She garnered two trophies as a child star: one for Ang Kaibigan Kong Sto. Nińo (FAMAS) and Wanted: Perfect Mother (CMMA). She bagged three Best Actress awards from Urian (Brutal, Salome, Kapit sa Patalim) and one each from CMMA (Andrea) and Metro Manila Film Festival (Shake, Rattle and Roll). The last came from the Film Academy of the Philippines (Kaya Kong Abutin ang Langit) and one each from Urian, CMMA and FAMAS (all for Biktima). She was the struggling singer Kathy in Moral, the guilt-ridden Cynthia in Brutal by Marilou Diaz Abaya or the unforgettable child-woman in Salome directed by Laurice Guillen. Lino Brocka farther honed her acting prowess when he got her as the dissident’s wife in Orapronobis and an ill-fated worker’s wife in Kapit Sa Patalim all of which made waves in film fests abroad....

...Lino (Brocka) taught me how to act straight from the heart; Laurice (Guillen) taught me how to make the most of my body as an acting instrument and Marilou (Diaz-Abaya) taught me the value of spontaneous acting by constant rehearsals, how to make the memorized lines come naturally. I credit all of them for what I am now. That they trusted me with those sensitive roles was something I would always remember regardless of how the films fared at the box office.” Even if well-made films did not always translate into box office triumphs, she remembered those films for something that they had imparted to the moviegoers. She had pointed out in the past. “I am proud of Orapronobis, Kapit Sa Patalim, Salome, Moral and Brutal because I find joy in being part of a film that gave us all a lesson. I watch other good pictures to pick up something and be compelled to think – regardless of whether they are about love, friendship or family relationship. I like a film if it gives me something I can adapt to my own life. I do not dislike a film just because I disagree with its message. I also watch film to see other people’s point of view..." - Pablo A. Tariman (READ MORE)

Child Star - "...Ms. Alajar was a child star herself. She started acting when she was eight years old, so she knows the pressures of being a child star. “I am not against child acting because we need child stars. In fact, there are many acting greats who started out as child stars. I just want to make sure that laws on children are properly implemented when dealing with these child stars, for example, not staying up late beyond their sleeping hours. Although, these children do it because of the fulfillment that they get,” she said. Ms. Alajar recalled that when she was a child actress, she couldn’t sleep after eight in the evening because there are still shots that need to be taken after dinner. “So, I slept at 10 in the evening. Then, they woke me up at 2 in the morning. When they did that, I didn’t want to get up. Now, I don’t sleep at 10 in the evening until one in the morning because I get irritable when people wake me up. Somehow, I traced it back to when I was younger,” she said. Now, Ms. Alajar is 42 years old and still looking young and flawless as ever. “I’m glad I lasted this long. Well, I had nothing else to do. I love acting. The passion for acting made me stay,” she said..." - Kathy M. Villalon (READ MORE)

Re-launched - "...After the breathing spell, the teenage Alajar was re-discovered by the late producer Dr. Jose Perez of Sampaguita Pictures, who signed her to an eight-year build-up contract. In Sampaguita, she did teen-aged supporting roles in such films as My Little Brown Girl, Isa, Dalawa, Tatlo, Magtago Na Kayo, Young Dreams and Sweet Sixteen. A year later, she starred in Cofradia, a re-make of a successful film in the 1950s starring Gloria Romero. In this production, which was to launch her career as a star in her own right she met Michael de Mesa, who would later become her husband. Unfortunately, her stint with Sampaguita was interrupted by the death of Dr. Perez. She was thereupon released from her contract and, for a time, her acting career was in limbo. The situation was made worse by the upsurge of sex films in the country. She was thus compelled to take roles that she now herself considers forgettable. Her days as a sex symbol were short-lived, she recalls, for she had neither the heart nor the guts for such vehicles. In the late 1970s, her career was re-launched a second time, there was no looking back. The early 1980s saw her metamorphose into a serious actress via such films as Brutal, Salome, Playgril, Manila by Night and Kontrobersiyal. In Brutal, she distinguished herself winning the best supporting actress award in metro Manila Film Festival. She was also chosen 1980 best actress by the film critics’ group, the Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino, for Brutal. She duplicated the feat by winning the best actress for Urian in Salome in 1981. In 1988, Alajar did only three films: Hiwaga sa Belete Drive, Minsan Pa Yakapin Mo Ako and Birds of Prey. In 1989, she appeared in a film by Lino Brocka, which was shown at the Cannes Film Festival in France. The film Fight for Us, says Gina, “was inspired by certain people and events in the country..." - Justino M. Dormiendo (READ MORE)

Regina Alatiit also known as Gina Alajar was born on (June 28, 1959) in Manila, she is a FAMAS and Gaward Urian Award winning Filipino film actress and television director. - Wikipedia (READ MORE)

Gina Alajar and Vilma Santos

Sister Stella L. (1984) - "...Sa pagkamatay ni Ninoy, ang napagbuhusan namin ng panahon nina Mike at Ding ay isang documentary na pinamagatang Signos at ang pelikulang Sister Stella L. Isang kanta mula sa binabalak na Brechtian zarzuela ang ginamit na isa sa mga theme songs ng Sister Stella L: ang “Aling Pag-ibig Pa,” na binigyang-tinig ni Pat Castillo sa pelikula at sa plaka. Nang ipalabas ang Sister Stella L. sa 1984 Venice International Film Festival, ang pamagat nito ay Sangandaan (Incroci sa Italyano, Crossroad sa Ingles). Pinagtiyap na sa unang storyline ay Sister Corazon de Jesus ang pangalan ni Sister Stella L. Ang nasa isip ko noon ay hindi si Corazon Aquino, kundi ang Sagrado Corazon de Jesus..." - Pete Lacaba (READ MORE)

Big Ike's Happening (1976) - "...All star casts din ang pelikulang handog ng Larry Santiago at Ike Lozada Productions na Big Ike's Happening (February 27, 1976) na tinampukan nina Vi, Tirso Cruz III, Walter Navaro, Ike Lozada, Aurora Salve, Gina Alajar, Jojit Paredes, Dondon Nakar, Winnie Santos, Arnold Gamboa, Maribel Aunor, Allan Valenzuela, Doyet Ilagan, Edward Campos, German Moreno, Inday Badiday, Ben David, Lilian Laing, Aruray, Nora Aunor, Perla Bautista, Charlie Davao, Esperanza Fabon, Eddie Peregrina, Bella Flores, Lito Legaspi, Christopher de Leon, Van de Leon, Pinky Montilla, Alma Moreno, Dencio Padilla, Andy Poe, Jerry Pons, Ric Rodrigo, Gloria Romero, Daria Ramirez, Darius Razon, Marianne de la Riva, Eddie San Jose, Ricky Santiago, Lorna Tolentino, Eddie Villamayor at Vic Vargas sa direksiyon nina Pablo at Bobby Santiago..." - Alfonso Valencia (READ MORE)

Dugo at pag-ibig sa kapirasong lupa (1975) - "...A Must for the Filipino History Students and for everyone who wants to awaken the innate nationalism in them. These series of stories depicting the fight of the Filipinos against colonialism of Spain, Japan and even their fellow Filipinos abusing the power in the government. A seemingly serious film but spiced with the star-studded cast like Fernando Poe Jr., Ramon Revilla, Joseph Estrada, Nora Aunor, Dante Rivero, Eddie Garcia, Vic Vargas, Goerge Estregan and the other all time favorite artists. This movie even highlighted the comparison between the love of country and the other kind of love we offer to our family and to our beloved as the story featured love stories in the midst of tragic and bloody war happening in our society..." - Kabayan Central (READ MORE)

Mga Batang Bangketa (1970) - "...By late 1969, movie producers had been tapping a Vilma Santos-Edgar Mortiz love team. Edgar was a Tawag ng Tanghalan winner. They started to be together in the movies, My Darling Eddie (1969) and The Jukebox King (1969)…In 1970, the love team of Vilma Santos and Edgar “Bobot” Mortiz was officially launched in the movie Young Love, together with the another popular love team during that time, Nora Aunor and Tirso Cruz III. The Vi and Bot love team went on to do 14 more movies in 1970—The Young Idols, Songs and Lovers, Sweethearts, Sixteen, Love Letters, Love is for the Two of Us, Mga Batang Bangketa, My Pledge of Love, Renee Rose, Baby Vi, Because You Are Mine, Edgar Loves Vilma, From the Bottom of My Heart, and I Love You Honey. All did well at the box-office..." - Rommel R. Llanes (READ MORE)

Sixteen (1970) - "...The success of Sixteen can be attributed to the playfulness and simplicity of the song selections. It suited the sweetness and purity of Vilma’s almost child like voice. The album earned Vilma her first golden record award and a remarkable signature song, “Sixteen.” The album established her as a successful recording artist. If I will compare her to today’s list of contemporary artists, I will compare Vilma to the likes of Jennifer Lopez, Britney Spears, and Madonna. Jennifer, Britney, and Madonna has thin but sweet voices just like Vilma. Like Vilma, these pop superstars have to work hard to achieve almost perfect products that their fans loved. Like Vilma, the three pop stars are great dancers which they all used to the max in their choreograph production numbers. The reluctant singer came out on top. Vilma Santos’s debut album made history. Sixteen made Vilma Santos a remarkable singer..." - RV (READ MORE)

Pinagbuklod ng Langit (1969) - "...Pero higit na tumatak si Luis nang gampanan niya ng dalawang beses si Pangulong Ferdinand Marcos. Ito’y sa kontrobersyal na pelikulang “Iginuhit ng Tadhana” bago tumakbo si Marcos bilang presidente noong 1965. Sinundan ito ng “Pinagbuklod ng Langit” noong 1969. Si Imee Marcos, na ginampanan noon ni Vilma Santos, naalala ang galing ni Luis na mahirap na daw tapatan ngayon. “His acting was understated. A great actor and a good friend. He played a big role in our lives. Halos naniniwala na ako na tatay ko siya dahil sa boses. Mahal na mahal namin si Luis Gonzales,” sabi ni Imee. Ayon sa kanyang kabiyak, huling hiling ni Luis na ipa-cremate ang kanyang labi..." - Mario Dumaual (READ MORE)


Thursday, June 27, 2013

Top 10 Leading Men


1. Christopher de Leon

Christopher De Leon (October 31, 1956 in Manila ) is a Filipino film actor who has 11 award wins and 23 award nominations, he has also become involved in politics. In the 1980s he appeared on the gag show Going Bananas and has appeared in over 120 films since the early 1970s. On July 1, 2010, he was sworn into office as the board member of the 2nd district of Batangas (Wikipedia). One of Philippine movies enduring love team, Vilma Santos and Christopher De Leon successfully transformed their film career from commercial success into critically acclaimed tandem. Both gave memorable performance in their 22 films mostly directed by acclaimed directors. The most notable commercial success are Elwood Perez’ Pakawalan Mo Ako and critically praised Relasyon.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 23 (Tag-ulan sa Tag-araw, Masarap Masakit ang Umibig, Ikaw ay Akin, Disco Fever, Nakawin Natin ang Bawa’t Sandali, Magkaribal, Pinay American Style, Gusto Kita Mahal ko Siya, Pakawalan Mo Ako, Relasyon, Sinasamba Kita, Haplos, Paano ba ang Mangarap?, Broken Marriage, Minsan Pa Nating Hagkan ang Nakaraan, Imortal, Ipagpatawad Mo, Dahil Mahal Kita: The Dolzura Cortez Story, Nagiisang Bituin, Hanggang Ngayon Ika’y Minamahal, Dekada ’70, Mano Po 3: My Love, Karma)



2. Edgar Mortiz

Edgar “Bobot” Mortiz is a Filipino movie/TV actor and actor. Born Edgardo Mortiz on August 30, 1954. He was the champion for 13 weeks on the network’s talent search, “Tawag ng Tanghalan,” hosted by Pugo and Patsy (both deceased). He was the Original and unbeatable partner of Vilma Santos (Wikipedia). The loveteam of Edgar Mortiz and Vilma Santos endured a stiff competition from teeny bopper love team of Nora Aunor and Tirso Cruz III and came up with equal success with string of hit films during the musical era of the 70s. Together they did forgettable but commercial hits and also some hints of the years to come to Vilma Santos’ long career. The most notable one: Dama De Noche.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 25 (Young Love, Teenage Jamboree, Songs and Lovers, Renee Rose, My Pledge of Love, Mga Batang Bangketa, Love Is for the Two of Us, I Love You Honey, From the Bottom of My Heart, Baby Vi, Love Letters, The Wonderful World of Music, The Sensations, The Young Idols, Sweethearts, Sixteen, Leron-Leron Sinta, Edgar Love Vilma, Don’t Ever Say Goodbye, Dama de Noche, Anak ng Aswang, Because You Are Mine, Kampanerang Kuba, Kasalanan Kaya, Karugtong ang Kahapon


3. Romeo Vasquez

Romeo Vasquez is a best actor awardee in the Asian Film Festival for his portrayal in Ako ang Maysala, He also starred in Lydia, Siete Amores, Wedding Bells, Isinakdal Ko Ang Aking Ama, Ginang Hukom, and Ako’y Iyong-Iyo which was all produced by Sampaguita Pictures Inc. His other movies included Ibulong Mo Sa Hangin, Hani-Hanimun, Sa Muling Pagkikita, Sa Digmaan at Pag-ibig, Ikaw ang Gabi at Ang Awit, Sa Pagsikat Ng Araw, Hanggang sa Kurtinang Bakal, Mariveles, Walang Wakas sa Matatapang, Pwede Ako… Puwede Ka Pa Ba?, Sa Aming Muling Pagkikita and Reputasyon. He co-starred witn Susan Roces in Bandana, Prinsesang Gusgusin and Maruja. His daughter with Amalia Fuentes, Liezel Sumilang, became the wife of Albert Martinez. His real name is Ricardo Sumilang from Lucban, Quezon (FAP).

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 11 (Nagaapoy na Damdamin, Pulot-Gata Puwede Kaya?, Dalawang Pugad Isang Ibon, Pinagbuklod ng Pag-ibig, Bakit Kailangan Kita, Pag-ibig Ko Sa Iyo Lang Ibibigay, Swing it Baby, Gusto Kita Mahal Ko Siya, Ayaw Kong Maging Querida, Dugo At Pag-ibig Sa Kapirasong Lupa, Happy Days Are Here Again)


4. Jay Ilagan

Jay Ilagan, born Julius Abad Ilagan on January 20, 1953 in Manila. Son of Sampaguita Pictures leading lady Corazon Noble and director Angel Esmeralda, he started as a child actor in the Philippine cinema. A matinée idol, he hosted “Stop, Look and Listen” and starred in My Son, My Son and Goin’ Bananas. He died from motorcycle accident in February, 1992 (Wikipilipinas). Jay Ilagan and Vilma Santos did seven films with commercial success except for one, their most critically acclaimed film, Sister Stella L.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 11 (Inspiration, Ang Konduktora, Tsismosang Tindera, Ang Hiwaga ni Mariang Cinderella, Paano Ba Ang Mangarap, Sister Stella L, Coed, Leron Leron Sinta, Ito Ang Pilipino, Remembrance, Karugtong Ng Kahapon)


5. Dindo Fernando

Dindo Fernando, born Jose Tacorda Chua Surban on Nov 19, 1940, Dindo Fernando became one of the most popular dramatic actor in the Philippines. He was famous as the father of famous TV soup character, Flor De Luna played by Janice De Belen in the 80s. He started at Sampaguita Pictures opposite Nida Blanca in 60s and later branched out into commercial drama actor in the 70s and 80s. His famous movie with Vilma was Gaano Kadalas Ang Minsan and Langis At Tubig.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 7 (Langis at Tubig, Gaano Kadalas ang Minsan, Baby Tsina, Karma, Langis At Tubig, Hiwalay, T-Bird At Ako)


6. Eddie Rodriguez

Eddie Rodriguez, is one of the greatest dramatic actors of Philippine cinema, he starred in such classics directed by Gregorio Fernandez as Kundiman ng Lahi, Luksang Tagumpay and Malvarosa with Charito Solis, Rebecca del Rio and Vic Silayan for LVN Pictures, Inc…His real name was Luis Enriquez from Zamboanga City (FAP). Eddie Rodriguez who was once played father to Vilma Santos in Vilma’s child star years later became her leading man in smash hits Nakakahiya and the sequel Hindi Nakakahiya.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 10 (Nakakahiya, Hindi Nakakahiya, Simula ng Walang Katapusan, Halik sa Paa Halik sa Kamay, Hiwalay, Mga Mata ni Angelita, Kay Tagal ng Umaga, Hindi Nahahati ang Langit, Kasalanan Kaya?, Sino ang may Karapatan?)


7. Mat Ranillo III


Mat Ranillo III, is Matias Archibald S Ranillo III in real life, son to veteran actress Gloria Sevilla and Mat Ranillo Jr. and brother to actress, Suzette Ranillo. He is now more popular as the dad of starlet, Krista Ranillo. Mat did four films with Vilma, the most memorable was Rubia Servios, directed by the late Lino Brocka.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 6 (Dalawang Pugad Isang Ibon, Kampus, Masarap Masakit ang Umibig, Rubia Servios, Relaks Ka Lang Sagot Kita, Mga Mata ni Angelita)


8. Bembol Rocco

Bembol Roco, is Rafael Roco, Jr. in real life is born November 20, 1953, an award-winning Filipino actor whose work ranges from films to television. He is famous for his critically acclaimed role as Julio Madiaga in Maynila: Sa mga Kuko ng Liwanag. Though he acts in his country’s films, he also had a small role in the 1982 Australian-U.S. film The Year of Living Dangerously(wikipedia). Bembol Rocco did three films with Vilma Santos, two of which were box office hit and one was critically acclaimed, Pagputi ng Uwak Pag-itim ng Tagak.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 4 (Pagputi ng Uwak, Pag-itm ng Tagak, Coed, Kampus, Pinay American Style)


9. Philip Salvador

Phillip ”Ipe” Salvador (born Phillip Mikael Reyes on Salvador August 21, 1953) is a three-time FAMAS award-winning Filipino actor. (Wikipedia)Vilma and Philip did three films, all directed by critically acclaimed directors, Marilou Diaz Abaya and the late, Lino Brocka. All these films were critically acclaimed and box office hits. He is also included in another VSR hit film, Sinasamba Kita.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 5 (Adultery, Baby Tsina, Rubia Servios, Batya’t Palu-palo, Bato Sa Buhangin)



10. Fernando Poe Jr.

Fernando Poe Jr. is Ronald Allan Kelley Poe in real life, born August 20, 1939 – December 14, 2004), better known as Fernándo Poe, Jr. and colloquially known as FPJ and Da King, was a Filipino actor and cultural icon. (wikiedia)Two of the three films FPJ and VSR did was a record breaking box office hits. FPJ received the Philippine National Artist Award in 2006.

Total Number of films with Vilma Santos: 5 (Batya’t Palu-Palo, Bato sa Buhangin, Ikaw ang Mahal Ko, Dugo At Pag-ibig sa Kapirasong Lupa, Mga Mata ni Angelita)


Wednesday, June 26, 2013

TEEN-AGE SENORITA (1971)


Basic Information: Directed: Jose Pepe Wenceslao; Story, screenplay: Maning Songco; Cast: Vilma Santos, Manny De Leon, Ike Lozada, Joe Alvarez, Yazmin Romero, Ricky Valencia, Chit Morales, Luis Benedicto, Jose Villafranca; Sound: Syndicate Combo, Geraldine; Original Music: Pewen; Film poster: Video48

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Reviews: "...Besides teaming up with Edgar Mortiz during her teen years, Vilma Santos also starred and appeared in many movies opposite other leading men..." - Simon Santos (READ MORE)

"...He became the leading man of Nora Aunor after Tirso Cruz III. Theirs was also a popular tandem. Decades later, when I finally got to talk to Nora during an interview, she revealed that their working relationship wasn’t really all that pleasant. Manny disappeared from the scene when Nora moved on to become a more serious actress. Whatever happened to Manny de Leon? When last heard from — many, many years ago — it was full of speculations and, sadly, those bits of information about him were unpleasant..." - Butch Francisco (READ MORE)

"...Kahit love team na sina Vilma at Bobot Mortiz, ipina-partner pa rin si Vi sa iba't ibang sikat na male heartthrobs noon." Jojo mentioned singing sensation Eddie Peregrina (paired with Vi in Mardy and I Do Love You, both shown in 1970), showbiz royalty Jay Ilagan (Inspiration, Remembrance, Ang Konduktora all shown in ‘72, and Sister Stella L in '84), young actor Paolo Romero (Ikaw Lamang in 1971), and even her rival's partners, Tirso Cruz III (Dingdong, Give Me Your Love, and Nobody's Child all in '73) and Manny de Leon (Teenage Señorita in 1971)..." - Rommel R. Llanes (READ MORE)

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

TAGOS NG DUGO (1987)

"haaaaahhhh…haaaaaahhhh....di ko sinasadya!...di ko sinasadya!" - Pina


Basic Information: Direction: Maryo J. De los Reyes; Adapted screenplay: Jake Tordesillas; Original screenplay: Via Hoffman; Cast: Vilma Santos, Michael De Mesa, Miguel Rodriguez, Francis Arnaiz, Richard Gomez, Mark Joseph, Lito Pimentel, Joey Hipolito, Joey Marquez, Tony Santos Sr., Caridad Sanchez, Lucita Soriano, Dante Castro, Bing Davao, Alicia Alonzo, Mia Gutierrez, Anna Feliciano, Strawberry, Ross Rival, Janet Beltran, Kristel Romero, Rene Hinojales, Ruben Balan, Rey Doria, Perry Fajardo, Emma Mendoza, Emil De Guzman, Archie Adamos, Vic Belaro, Rene Balan, Nemie Gutierrez, Joe Lapid, Rabes Marquez, Pong Mercado, Arbie Antonio, Alex Toledo, Gil Zaldaga, Remy Reyes, Nina Lorenzo, Alfred Barreto, Rey Ferrer, Manny Torres, Monette Arroyo, Chinggay Feliciano, Lea Locsin, Maloy Marquez, Linda Lanuza, Cheche Morales, Sally Blanco, Gloria Mercado, Nancy Romero, Arthur Cassanova, Nonoy Gaites, Deo Macalma, Alex Baluyut, Johnny Francisco, Enrico Villa, Helen Pondevida, Aida Carmona, Eileen Tinio, Madeleine Nicolas, Raquel Villavicencio; Original Music: Jaime Fabregas; Cinematography: Ely Cruz; Editing: Jess Navarro; Production Design: Cesar Hernando, Lea Locsin; Sound: Joe Climaco, Jun Martinez; Producer: Via Hoffman

Plot Description: A young Pina was traumatized when her family was murdered while she had her first menstruation. She grown up into a serial killer transforming herself to different personalities as she seduced one man at a time grossly killing them while in the act of sexual pleasure. Eventually Pina was caught by the authorities. Considered by some critics as a feminist movie, Tagos ng Dugo has the feeling of claustrophobic but stylized European slasher movie that showcased the wide acting range of Philippines’ cinematic diva, Vilma Santos. The film lacks the usual long dialogue of her previous films but in this film, she was given a chance to show her body movements and “eye” acting that climaxed with tour de force ending, a mad lion being caught by armed hunters.

Film Achievements: FAMAS: Best Actress - Vilma Santos; CMMA Best Actress - Vilma Santos; FAP: Best Musical Score - Jaime Fabregas, Best Actress nomination - Vilma Santos

Film Reviews: "...In Filipino movies, drama is synonymous with exaggeration. In many films, scenes of cruelty, violence and torrid sex are depicted with little restraint so that they border on distasteful. In Tagos ng Dugo (1987), a young girl is raped after her parents are mudered. While she's being abused, blood from her murdered mother's body drips through the ceiling and falls on her forehead. In Kapag Napagod and Puso (1988), a harassed movie director (Christopher de Leon) takes out his frustration on his young wife (Snooky Serna) by smashing her face, pounding her head on the wall and punching her pregnant body black and blue. Once it was sufficient to depict adult activities by implication. To speak of sex on screen, it was enough to show a couple closing a door as they entered a room. A passionate embrace or a kiss is always followed by a quick fade to black. But nowadays, with sexual liberation and the heightened sense of realism demanded by viewers, Filipino movies have become more graphic in their treatment of sexual matters. There is now a greater curiousity for the phenomenon of the woman's body. It is a must to depict menstruation (Tagos ng Dugo), labor pains (Kapag Napagod ang Puso) and a miscarriage (Burlesque Queen, 1977) by showing blood stains on the garment near the area of the vagina and blood trickling down a woman's leg. The first signs of pregnancy are always dramtized by showing a woman throwing up in asink (Pasan Ko ang Daigdig, 1987). Abortion scenes have a very clinical look: a woman must be shown lying down with her legs in stirrups as a doctor or quack performs the bloody operation. Since abortion is illegal in the Philippines, it is common to depict abortion scenes ending in tragedy. In Celso Ad. Castillo's Nympha (1971), a woman is left to die naked, wallowing in her own blood on the floor after doctors fail to stop her bleeding following an abortion. Childbirth scenes are just as graphic. In Nunal sa Tubig (1977), a baby's head is shown emerging from a vagina..." - Emmanuel Anastacio Reyes, Notes on Philippine Cinema (Collected Writings on Cinema)..." - Emmanuel Anastacio Reyes, Notes on Philippine Cinema Collected Writings on Cinema (READ MORE)

"...I had actually intended to evaluate the industry’s artistic accomplishments from January to June this year, but the consideration of causes simply overwhelmed the original subject. Anyway, in providing a listing of the more acceptable items, it would serve our purposes well to keep in mind that these titles were originally greeted with expressions of disappointment and frustration, with only passing acknowledgement of their respective merits – to which I now most carefully give mention...Tagos ng Dugo (Maryo J. de los Reyes, dir.): kinkiness rounded out with psychological backgrounding and propelled forward with a sense of conviction and sympathy for the plight of the subject..." - Joel David, National Midweek, 26 August 26, 1987 (READ MORE)

"...And what do we make out of Maryo de los Reyes' Tagos ng Dugo, with its grossly improbable tale of multiple schizophrenia and made all the worse by the director's penchant for pseudo-character changes? Personally, i would rate Vilma Santos here as having been last year's most colorul character instead of a consumate performer...." - Justino Dormiendo, Manila Standard, Feb 23, 1988 (READ MORE)

"...She has lost some pounds (due to the gruelling shooting of her recent film, Tagos ng Dugo, but she is still the same radiant beauty...Santos is likewise bugged by the observation (presumably by some Nora Aunor supporters) that her performance in Tagos ng Dugo, wherein she portrayed a psychopath, was "Norang-Nora." She could not divine how the comment was made in the first place. Was it becauise, in the film, she was handled by Maryo de los Reyes who is known to be a close friend and one of the favorite directors of Nora Aunor? Or, was it because her role in Tagos called for a lot of the so called Nora-style acting -expressive eye movements, prolonged byt quiet crying binges? Is she, in the eyes of some Aunor loyalist, as good as actress now as their idol? "Wala akong ginagaya," defended the actress. "That was Pina, the role, I was acting out. I did not think of Guy or anybody else when I was doing the film. "But you know, that (comment) is good," she said as an after thought. "Kinukumpara pa rin kami hanggang ngayon. That means kami pa rin - the rivalry is still strong." On the other hand, one is hard put to imagine Aunor attempting Santos' "patented" acting style (the ease and confidence in delivering kilometric line, among others). If and when she does in any of her future films, I told the actress, we would also say "Vilmang-Vilma" siya! She burst out laughing..." - Mario V. DumaualManila Standard, Feb 19, 1987 (READ MORE)

First of all, serial murder is almost alien to Philippine crime journalism, a fact that’s due certainly to our police force’s lack of records on such cases. Now, this police record gap may of course in turn reflect a lack of local police coordination towards (or, worse, capability for) determining crime patterns as possibly serial. Unless those determinations have to do with the usual cop-out that goes like this: “it’s another NPA hit” blah blah blah, or “its another murder similar to the one that happened last week, and this is reflective of pornograhy’s...”. My above statements are meant to illustrate a national wont to demean our own police organization’s capability (or, worse, intelligence) that may neither be fair nor productive, but it would be a habit that certainly is not undeserved given the record -- official and memorial -- of the police prioritizing its own people’s interests and “rackets”. Given this background, therefore, Tagos ng Dugo can be said to be a demonstration of serial crimes’ possible placement in local shores, and that would certainly be a valid view. Except, of course, that in effect Tagos is also -- and probably should be read primarily as -- a demonstration of possiblities other than the merely forensic. I say “should be”, since the police is portrayed fairly in the film, albeit not exactly generously. So what could be all the fuss about Tagos’ value? “Production values” is the often-heard reason, needing elucidation. A breakthrough for Philippine psychological movies? Probably.

Let me explore a few other angles on this seeming cross between Francois Truffaut’s “The Bride Wore Black” and Luis Benuel’s “Belle Du Joir” -- I don’t know if screenwriter Jake Tordesillas or Delos Reyes himself should be congratulated for the cohesion of multi-resultants in this work. Part of this multi-readings would be the movie as a feminist take on womankind’s monthly pains as a form of excuse for female monthly insanities, insanities our macho’s regard as regular terrorism on the whole of mankind (men or society as a whole). It is with that reading that the ending apologies, by Vilma Santos in the lead role, might be understood as a plea for understanding of how all of woman’s monthly Eve-behavior should not be seen as a Biblical sin but as an equal (to, say, man’s beastly) naturalness... Another feminist reading, more radical perhaps, would treat the film as a view of how Philippine society (the men in it, primarily) approaches provincial innocence, educational weakness, and “female’s weaker sanity” as stimuli for abuse... There is, however, the possibly more general reading of the film as an apologia for insanity qua itself, how it should be treated as a disease instead of as a monster to be eliminated... And finally, there’s the possiblity that the film is actually a depiction of how crazy the world outside the insane mind really is, albeit this view would probably be the least successful direction for the film... As a bonus, maybe we can also bring the movie to more latent, more philosophical territory, say, how it depicts the sanity of innocence. But, given the validity and possible weight of all those approaches, what finally makes this movie a jewel in Philippine cinema history is how it brings forth -- every time you watch it -- its case achievements in directorial and film editing dramaturgy ( including the recurring stage-like choreography, Hitchcockish camera positionings, and acting pacing within). For the serious student of third world filmmaking, here is a requisite Philippine movie from where to cull precious fragments. In these fragments, he/she is sure to find sparkles that are in themselves gems. Source: E Nadurata's Vilma Santos’ web-site

Bihirang talakayin sa pelikulang Pilipino ang mga problemang sikolohikal. Matapang itong sinuong noong 1987 nina Direktor Maryo J. de los Reyes at ng manunulat na si Jake Tordesillas sa Tagos ng Dugo (V.H. Films). Itinatampok si Vilma Santos bilang Pina isang babaeng may madilim na nakaraan. Nang magkaroon ng buwanang bisita si Pina sa unang pagkakataon pinaliguan ito ng kanyang ina (Alicia Alonzo) taliwas sa pamahiin nating mga Pilipino na bawal maligo ang isang babae kung ito ay may regla. Dahilan ito upang magkaroon siya ng dismenorrhea. Bahagi ng kanyang nakaraan ang malagim na pagpatay sa kanyang pamilya ng kapatid (Archie Adamos) ng kalaguyo ng kanyang ama (Ross Rival). Nagdalaga si Pina sa loob ng mental hospital at nang nasa tamang edad na ito at sapat na pag-iisip, nakitira na ito sa kanyang tiyahin (Caridad Sanchez) at ang asawa nitong hepe ng pulis (Tony Santos, Sr.). May mga eksenang halaw sa banyagang pelikula. Ang eksenang nakabihis tsina si Pina nang nakipagtagpo siya sa isang telephone lineman (Joey Marquez) ay galing sa karakter na China Blue ni Kathleen Turner sa Crimes Of Passion ni Direktor Ken Russell. Maraming bahagi ng kuwento ang kuha sa nobelang The Seven Deadly Sins, ngunit kung iisipin, ano'ng pelikula nga ba hindi kumuha ng inspirayson sa mga obrang gawa ng ibang kinikilalang direktor?

Nagtatrabaho si Pina sa isang karinderya sa tapat ng presinto at dito niya unang nakita si Andy (Francis Arnaiz) isang pulis na kasama sa trabaho ng kanyang tiyuhin. Dito unang nabuo ang natatagong obsesyon ni Pina kay Andy. Sa pagtakbo ng istorya maraming naka-enkuwentrong iba't-ibang lalaki si Pina. Sa tuwing dumarating ang kanyang buwanang bisita ay tumatakas siya sa bahay at nagpupunta sa isang lumang mansyong malapit sa kanyang tinitirhan. Nag-aayos, nagbibihis, sumasama sa unang lalaking nakapansin sa kanya at habang nakikipagtalik, bumabalik ang mga alaala ng karahasang naranasan sa kamay ng mapang-aping mga lalaking nagsamantala sa kanya at ito at kanyang pinapatay. Sa anggulong ito halos umikot ang kabuuan ng pelikula. Masasabing naging matapang ang mga bumuo ng pelikulang Tagos Ng Dugo dahil sa tahasan nitong tinalakay ang sekswalidad ng mga pangunahing tauhan. Mapapansing pinagtuunan ng pansin ang kabuuan ng karakter ni Pina na buong husay ginampanan ni Vilma Santos. Ang aktres ay halos nasa lahat ng eksena sa pelikula. Maituturing na "hysterical" ang uri ng pag-arte ni Vilma ngunit sa pelikulang ito ay malaki ang naitulong nito upang maipahatid niya ang sapat na emosyon sa epektibong paraan. Malaki ang naitulong ni Direktor Maryo J. de los Reyes sa pagsasalarawan ng kuwento ni Pina. Nailahad niya ng maayos ang mga problemang sikolohikal hindi lamang ni Pina kundi ng buong lipunan. Makikitang binigyang diin ang posibleng solusyon sa mga suliraning ipinamalas sa pelikula. Maaring may ilang pagkukulang ang pelikula sa naging takbo ng istorya ngunit naisalba ito ng mahusay na pagdidirehe ni de los Reyes. Sa anggulong ito naging malaking bahagi sa tagumpay ng Tagos Ng Dugo ang direktor dahil sa tuwiran niyang naipahayag ang patotoo sa mga isyung tinalakay sa buong pelikula. Dito rin natamo ni Vilma ang kanyang ikaapat na FAMAS Best Actress Award bago siya tuluyang naluklok sa Hall Of Fame nang sumunod na taon. - Jojo De Vera, “Hindi Mapigil Ang Tagos Ng Dugo,” Sari-Saring Sinengpinoy Blogspot

The story revolves around Pina, a woman haunted by her past traumatic experiences. She always feels afraid at the sight of blood. Whenever she is physically or emotionally injured, she experiences the so-called "post-traumatic syndrome," which persuades her to kill every man who has hurt her. She disguises herself as a prostitute with different personalities, and becomes a mysterious murderer. The Review - The future National Artist for Film and recent U.P. Gawad Plaridel and Gawad Suri awardee Vilma Santos has done a gamut of roles. She is the only Filipina actress on record who has the most impressive resume of great performances (and is credible in any role, including Darna, the Pinoy female version of Superman), and has amassed 50 plus acting trophies. The Variety magazine and the world film community has dubbed her the Filipino Cinematic Diva and the Meryl Streep of the Philippines. If her luck continues, she may end up in Guinness’ Almanac as an actor with the most number of acting awards. One of my favorite Vilma characters is that of Pina, a serial killer, in Tagos ng Dugo. Directed by Mario J. Delos Reyes, it won four best actress awards for Vilma: her second CMMA, fourth FAMAS, and two from magazine polls. When it comes to edgy, neurotic, complex roles, leave it to Versatile Vilma, the Meryl Streep-like cerebral and intuitive actress who was born to play them. Vilma’s foray into the "luka-luka" genre began in Dama De Noche where she plays twin sisters, one of which is, you bet, neurotic. Bernal’s classic Ikaw Ay Akin is best remembered for the manic-depressive, chain-smoking, Valium-popping, liberated, free-spirit Sandra (Vilma). Says critic Mario Bautista in his review: As the uptight Sandra, Vilma Santos has the script’s choicest, wittiest lines. She makes the most of them and gives a fairly accurate portrait of an emotionally insecure young woman. She likewise handles her final breakdown exceedingly well. There is a common thread in classic films like Broken Marriage, Relasyon, Tagos ng Dugo, Bata, Bata, Dolzura Cortez and Hahamakin Lahat. Outstandingfilms, thanks to Vilma’s perfect portrayal of women on the verge of a nervous breakdown. It is no wonder that the late National Artist Lino Brocka quoted: "Vilma can do any role now. She registers like water, she has overtaken Nora Aunor." The U.P. MassCom jurors concurred with Brocka and gave Vilma that seal of approval by giving her the National Artist award precursor, the prestigious U.P. Gawad Plaridel for excellence in film acting. And oh yes, let us not forget the Gawad Suri Award. In layman’s terms, she is the best in the business, period!

Back to Tagos ng Dugo. At best, it is Vilma’s most emotionally and physically, albeit, draining role. Maryo J. made Vilma succeed to say more with less as we will find out. In the opening scene, Pina’s medical history is revealed: schizophrenia, painful menstruation, manic-depressive. Then we see the pubescent Pina screaming and writhing in pain on her first menstruation, calls out to her mother: "Inay!" The luminous Alicia Alonzo plays her mother and tells her “dalaga ka na!” Menarche and puberty did not sit well with Pina. While menstruating, she discovers of her father’s affair with a circus girl who her father accidentally kills in the "knife roulette" show, as the victim’s blood spills on her face. The girl’s family gets even, kills her whole family one night, while she gets raped. Tagos ng Dugo. Here’s the message: hell hath no fury than a woman violated while having painful menstruation. She has bridges to burn and many losses in her life. She has become a lost and tormented soul. A victim. A monster is born. Oscar best actress Charleze Theron may have taken an inspiration from Vilma’s Pina. Flash forward: Orphan and just released from a mental institution, the grownup Pina is seen staying with her aunt Caridad Sanchez and her husband, a police officer, Tony Santos, Sr. This is where Pina’s "calvary" as victim (again) begins. So many men, so many abusers, or so we thought. Enter Michael De Mesa, Santos, Sr.’s nephew who has lust at first sight on Pina. "Malagu, ’ne?" (She’s beautiful), De Mesa gushes on the coy and evasive Pina. In Kapampangan, Tony tells De Mesa that she was just released from the mental hospital. Michael attempts to enter Pina’s room one night but is unsuccessful.

Next to Dekada ’70 perhaps, this is one movie where Vilma succeeded in quiet scenes, by just using her eyes. Whether she writhes quietly in pain during her period or is scared of the inevitable such as Michael’s evil intent, this is the vintage Vilma now. Less is more. The triumph of restraint and hard work. Versatile, Inc. She meets the nice and good-looking cop (Francis Arnaiz) in the police station where she works as a sloppy, unfocused canteen helper who gets easily rattled by men around her, earning the ire of her boss Lucita Soriano. "Ano ba Pina, ang tanga-tanga mo. Ang dami mo nang nabasag na baso, hah?" Arnaiz is different: caring, sensitive, a gentleman. She is Pina’s crush and hero. She steals her crush’s photo ID and in her secret hideaway, kisses the photo, followed by a nervous, hysterical laugher, reminiscent of her confrontation scene with Gloria Romero in Kapag Langit ang Humatol? Enter a notorious rapist who is now in jail who held Vilma by the neck and mashes her breasts. Vilma becomes hysterical and cries unconsolably even after Arnaiz and the cops come to her rescue. This scene is again Vintage Vilma. When the rapist is released from prison, he chooses Vilma as his first victim and in the rape attempt, Arnaiz shoots him dead. Again, blood droops on Pina’s face. Tagos ng Dugo. Next thing we know, De Mesa almost succeeds in raping her but falls off the window when Vilma fights back. She uses Michael’s knife to scare him off. Now wiser, stronger, sophisticated and smarter, Pina finds solace and a sanctuary in an abandoned house across from where she lives. She learns how to apply mascara and wig. A serial killer is born. This is where she plans her revenge. So many men, so little time. It’s payback time. In the wise use of flashbacks, we learn that Pina is violated again and again by the very people who should be helping her cope with her unstable mental status, one of which is the evil warden Lito Pimentel. She falls in love with her therapist who politely turns her down. It is a series of painful abuse and rejection for the sad, sad life of Pina.

We also learn that she has a brother/sailor who sends her monthly stipend which she never benefits from and in his last visit, Pina begs him to stay with him. In multiple flashbacks, we see a helpless victim, Pina crying out for love and acceptance. Nobody seems to listen. A dysfunctional family. Abused physically and emotionally. Neglected. Rejected. Unwanted. Tormented. Untreated chemical imbalance. A perfect scenario for the birth of a schizophrenic, manic-depressive serial killer. Disguised as a prostitute, she kills her tormentors one by one with a knife she steals from De Mesa, with the exception of a druggie, the excellent Richard Gomez in cameo role. Here is a performance that is Vilma Santos’ gift to the world, right there in the dark theatre and on the silver screen. Are killers made or born? Is society or family to blame for sociopaths? Are menarche and the drive to kill symbiotic? In a touching scene where she literally shreds Arnaiz’s stolen photo with her teeth (Arnaiz reconciles with and will marry her fiancée) out of jealousy, and rejection, Pina plans to make it out with Arnaiz in a hotel where the cops hang out to have a good time and where Arnaiz will screw a prosti as the boys’ "gift" to him. Vilma is that prosti. When Aranaiz discovers it is the demented Pina, he takes pity on her and prepares to put on his clothes. What, rejected again? Pina pleads Arnaiz to love her, hug her, kiss her. She will take no for an answer. Like a raving lunatic, she strikes Arnaiz with the knife. Meanwhile, little did Pina know that Caridad and Santos, Jr. discovers her dark secret and desperately calls the boys to watch out for Pina, the deranged murderer who might be stalking on Arnaiz. Sanches and Santos, Jr. either fumbles with the phone number or gets a busy signal. Wala pa kasing cell phone noon, eh! Next thing we know, the cops run to save Arnaiz from Pina. The hunter is now the hunted. What they discover in the room is a wounded but still alive Arnaiz who cries: "Huwag!" as his colleagues aim their guns at the crazed woman with thick mascara and wig.

In a memorable and touching scene, the camera pans on a screaming, out of control, bloodied, lost her sanity Pina, angry one moment, repentant ("di ko sinasadya!") the next, and then mumbles incoherently. Prison bars are etched across her whole body, and the movie ends. Pina is Vilma and Vilma is Pina. This is their story. This is their movie. This is acting at its best. Thank God, Mayor Vilma Santos has come to the rescue of the Pina’s in this world. Unlike the super heroine and fictitious Darna who kicks butt as she battles with the forces of darkness and defend the people, here is Vilma, the philanthropist and the Mother Theresa of her generation, in the flesh, reaching out to the poorest of the poor of her Lipa constituents. Through her loving heart and helping hands, she has actually helped thousands of society’s outcasts, the poor and the needy. This is the Vilma Santos today: successful, revered, in demand, a winner in all fronts. A National Treasure! Who would have thought that the second fiddle to another actress will become the greatest film practitioner of all time and a capable Mayor? A great actress and an excellent Mayor. Nobody does it better. - Mar Garces, “Tagos Ng Dugo: The original Naglalayag Revisited,” V Magazine 2006
First of all, serial murder is almost alien to Philippine crime journalism, a fact that's due certainly to our police force's lack of records on such cases. Now, this police-records gap may of course in turn reflect a lack of local police coordination towards (or, worse, capability for) determining crime patterns as possibly serial. Unless those determinations have to do with the usual cop-out that goes like this: "it's another NPA hit" blah blah blah, or "it's another murder similar to the one that happened last week, and this is reflective of pornography's . . .". My above statements are meant to illustrate a national wont to demean our own police organization's capability (or, worse, intelligence) that may neither be fair nor productive, but it would be a habit that certainly is not undeserved given the record -- official and memorial -- of the police's prioritizing its own people's interests and "rackets." Given this background, therefore, Tagos Ng Dugo can be said to be a demonstration of serial crimes' possible placement in local shores, and that would certainly be a valid view. Except, of course, that in effect Tagos is also -- and probably should be read primarily as -- a demonstration of possibilities other than the merely forensic. I say "should be," since the police is portrayed fairly in the film, albeit not exactly generously. So what could be all the fuss about Tagos' value? "Production values" is the often-heard reason, needing elucidation. A breakthrough for Philippine psychological movies? Probably. Let me explore a few other angles on this seeming cross between Francois Truffaut's The Bride Wore Black and Luis Buñuel's Belle du Jour -- I don't know if screenwriter Jake Tordesillas or De los Reyes himself should be congratulated for the cohesion of multi-resultants in this work. Part of this multi-readings would be the movie as a feminist take on womankind's monthly pains as a form of excuse for female monthly insanities, insanities our machos regard as regular terrorism on the whole of mankind (men or society as a whole).

It is with that reading that the ending apologies, by Vilma Santos in the lead role, might be understood as a plea for understanding of how all of woman's monthly Eve-behavior should not be seen as a Biblical sin but as an equal (to, say, men's beastly) naturalness. . . . Another feminist reading, more radical perhaps, would treat the film as a view of how Philippine society (the men in it, primarily) approaches provincial innocence, educational weakness, and "females' weaker sanity" as stimuli for abuse. . . . There is, however, the possibly more general reading of the film as an apologia for insanity qua itself, how it should be treated as a disease instead of as a monster to be eliminated. . . . And finally, there's the possibility that the film is actually a depiction of how crazy the world outside the insane mind really is, albeit this view would probably be the least successful direction for the film. . . . As a bonus, maybe we can also bring the movie to more latent, more philosophical territory, say, how it depicts the sanity of innocence. But, given the validity and possible weight of all those approaches, what finally makes this movie a jewel in Philippine cinema history is how it brings forth -- every time you watch it -- its case achievements in directorial and film editing dramaturgy (including the recurring stage-like choreography, Hitchcockish camera positionings, and acting pacing within). For the serious student of third-world filmmaking, here is a requisite Philippine movie from where to cull precious fragments. In these fragments, he/she is sure to find sparkles that are in themselves gems. - Vicente-Ignacio S. de Veyra III, “Tagos Ng Dugo (1987): Maryo J. de los Reyes' Jewel,” Geocities, July 2002 - April 2004


"...At first, policemen manning the station likened Pina's arrival in their canteen as a breath of fresh air in the dirty world they work in. Although she is not entirely all right up there she is pretty and quiet. An industrious helper she only absents herself once a month because of extreme dysmennorhea. Then men started getting killed within the vicinity of the police station. A vacationing overseas worker a prisoner on bail a handsome playboy a drug crazed youth... Is it only a coincidence that the murders seem to happen exactly on the days Pina is experiencing her very painful monthly period?..." - Mav Shack (READ MORE)



Monday, June 24, 2013

OUR LOVE AFFAIR (1971)


Basic Information Director: Leonardo L. Garcia Story, screenplay: Leonardo L. Garcia, Manuel Songco; Cast: Vilma Santos, Edgar Mortiz, Nello Nayo, Patricia Mijares, Nympha Bonifacio; Original Music: Danny Subido; Cinematography: Nestor Orense; Film poster: Video48

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Reviews: "...By late 1969, movie producers had been tapping a Vilma Santos-Edgar Mortiz love team. Edgar was a Tawag ng Tanghalan winner. They started to be together in the movies, My Darling Eddie (1969) and The Jukebox King (1969)...In 1970, the love team of Vilma Santos and Edgar "Bobot" Mortiz was officially launched in the movie Young Love, together with the another popular love team during that time, Nora Aunor and Tirso Cruz III. The Vi and Bot love team went on to do 14 more movies in 1970—The Young Idols, Songs and Lovers, Sweethearts, Sixteen, Love Letters, Love is for the Two of Us, Mga Batang Bangketa, My Pledge of Love, Renee Rose, Baby Vi, Because You Are Mine, Edgar Loves Vilma, From the Bottom of My Heart, and I Love You Honey. All did well at the box-office..." - Rommel R. Llanes (READ MORE)

"...Noong Dekada ’70, ang mga young stars ay kailangang marunong kumanta dahil yun ang uso kaya naman nagtayo ng sariling recording company ang nasirang manager ni Vi na si William Leary dahil ayaw niyang pahuhuli sa uso ang kanyang alaga. Ilan sa mga naging recording artists ng WILEARS RECORDS bukod kay Vi ay sina Edgar Mortiz, Ed Finlan, Sahlee Quizon, Hilda Koronel at Esperanza Fabon. According to Vi, kapag nagrerecord siya ng kanta ay nakatalikod siya sa dingding ng recording company at si Bobot ang umaalalay sa kanya. Ang SIXTEEN, na sinulat ni Danny Subido ang unang recording na ginawa ni Vi at ito ay flipsided by It’s So Wonderful To Be In Love. Ang SIXTEEN ay agad naging gold record at dahil dito ay gumawa ng pelikula ang Tagalog Ilang Ilang Productions, ang home studio ni Vi at ito ay ginawa nilang pamagat katambal si Edgar Mortiz. Hindi nyo naitatanong, muntik nang manalo si Vi bilang most promising singer sa AWIT AWARDS noong early ’70s..." - Alfons. Valencia (READ MORE)

"...The loveteam of Edgar Mortiz and Vilma Santos endured a stiff competition from teeny bopper love team of Nora Aunor and Tirso Cruz III and came up with equal success with string of hit films during the musical era of the 70s. Together they did forgettable but commercial hits and also some hints of the years to come to Vilma Santos’ long career. The most notable one: Dama De Noche. Total Number of films with Vilma Santos – 25 (Young Love, Teenage Jamboree, Songs and Lovers, Renee Rose, My Pledge of Love, Mga Batang Bangketa, Love Is for the Two of Us, I Love You Honey, From the Bottom of My Heart, Baby Vi, Love Letters, The Wonderful World of Music, The Sensations, The Young Idols, Sweethearts, Sixteen, Leron-Leron Sinta, Edgar Love Vilma, Don’t Ever Say Goodbye, Dama de Noche, Anak ng Aswang, Because You Are Mine, Kampanerang Kuba, Kasalanan Kaya, Karugtong ang Kahapon..." - RV (READ MORE)

"...Si Edgar Mortiz ang unang nakapareha ni Vilma Santos as a teen star. Nakilala sila as the "Subok na Matibay, Subok na Matatag" loveteam called Vi and Bot at naging magka-steady sila sa tunay na buhay. Marami silang ginawang pelikula as teen stars in the early 70s..." - Showbiz Portal (READ MORE)

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